Saturday, November 2, 2013

Smith: Chiesa Will Feel Like He’s in Brazil at UFN 31


The UFC has understandably turned to several military vets for the promotion’s next “Fight for the Troops” event which goes down on November 6th, and one of those is Colton Smith. The active U.S. Army member is set to fight fellow TUF winner Michael Chiesa at the event, which will be hosted by Kentucky’s Fort Campbell.


Of course, Smith is keenly aware of the bond soldiers and veterans share, which is why he’s certain he’ll have a ton of home crowd support for the fight. While speaking to MMA Junkie.com recently, the 26 year-old noted:



“It’s in front of the troops; it’s in front of my brothers and sisters in arms,” Smith said. “This is in my backyard. This is going to be foreign to him. It’s going to be like fighting in Brazil against a Brazilian.


“I’m fighting on a military base with my brothers and sisters in arms, people that I’ve served overseas with and trained with and been to schools with and served the last eight years with, so I’m extremely excited. I can’t wait to put on a show for the fans.”



And as far as Chiesa as a fighter? Smith doesn’t think ”technically he poses too much of an issue for me”, but credited the lightweight for having “heart” and “drive.”


It’s certainly an important fight, as Smith is looking to rebound from a stoppage loss to Robert Whittaker, while Chiesa was submitted by Jorge Masvidal in his last scrap.


Stay tuned to MMA Frenzy.com for all your UFC news and coverage.




Source: http://mmafrenzy.com/95635/smith-chiesa-will-feel-like-hes-in-brazil-at-ufn-31/
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Results of the SAFE-PCI trial presented at TCT 2013

Results of the SAFE-PCI trial presented at TCT 2013


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Contact: Judy Romero
jromero@crf.org
Cardiovascular Research Foundation



Novel study finds using radial versus femoral access during cardiac catheterization may have benefits in women



SAN FRANCISCO, CA October 29, 2013 A clinical trial conducted exclusively in women suggests that an initial strategy of using the radial artery in the arm as the entry point for cardiac catheterization or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in women has potential for reducing bleeding complications. SAFE-PCI for Women is the first registry-based randomized trial in the United States and the first multicenter trial comparing radial with femoral access in the U.S., and its primary findings were presented today at the 25th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine.


Women are at particular risk for bleeding and vascular complications after PCI. While a transradial approach can potentially reduce these complications, this technique has never been prospectively studied in women. Women also have smaller radial arteries than men making radial PCI potentially more challenging.


The SAFE-PCI for Women Trial randomized 1,787 women undergoing elective PCI, urgent PCI or diagnostic catheterization with possible PCI to either a radial or femoral approach. In a novel approach designed to minimize trial costs, the trial used prospectively gathered data collection instruments based upon the existing National Cardiovascular Research Infrastructure (NCRI), a clinical trial infrastructure created through collaboration between the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the American College of Cardiology, and the Duke Clinical Research Institute. It was also built on the NCDR CathPCI Registry, the largest ongoing PCI registry in the world.


The primary efficacy endpoint was bleeding (BARC Types 2, 3 or 5) or vascular complications requiring intervention within 72 hours post-procedure or at hospital discharge, whichever came first. The primary feasibility endpoint was procedural failure defined as the inability to complete the PCI from the assigned access site.


After 1,120 patients had been randomized, 446 of whom had undergone PCI, review of data by the Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) showed that the primary efficacy event rate was markedly lower than expected. The DSMB recommended termination of the trial because the trial was unlikely to show a difference at the planned sample size. No harm was noted in either arm; therefore, the Steering Committee voted to continue the study until enrollment in a quality-of-life sub study was complete.


A total of 1,787 patients were randomized (893 to radial access, 894 to femoral access), 691 of those who underwent PCI (345 radial access and 346 femoral access). In the PCI group, bleeding and complication rates were 1.2 percent in the radial group compared to 2.9 percent in the femoral group (p=0.12). When assessing the overall cohort of randomized patients (those receiving both diagnostic procedures alone as well as those receiving PCI), bleeding and complication rates were 0.6 percent vs. 1.7 percent (p=0.03). The overall procedural failure rate was 6.7 percent in the radial group and 1.9 percent in the femoral group (p

"The SAFE-PCI for Women trial represents several 'firsts.' It is the first randomized trial of interventional strategies in women, the first multicenter randomized trial comparing radial with femoral access in the United States, and the first registry-based randomized trial in the U.S. The treatment benefit of radial access over femoral access was larger than expected (~60 percent) in both the PCI group and total randomized cohorts," said lead investigator Sunil V. Rao, MD. Dr. Rao is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Duke University Medical Center.


"Findings suggest that an initial strategy of radial access is reasonable and may be preferred in women, with the recognition that a proportion of patients will require bailout to femoral access," Dr. Rao added.


"As the first registry-based randomized trial in the United States, the SAFE-PCI for Women trial demonstrates a new paradigm shift for conducting efficient practical clinical trials using the National Cardiovascular Research Infrastructure. This trial construct is a promising approach for future clinical investigations."


###


The SAFE-PCI for Women trial was funded by a consortium of academic, industry, and government entities including Abbott Vascular, ACIST Medical, Eli Lilly, Guerbet, Medtronic, Terumo Medical, The Medicines Company, the FDA Office of Women's Health, and the Duke Clinical Research Institute. Dr. Rao reported being a consultant for AstraZeneca and The Medicines Company.


About CRF and TCT



The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is an independent, academically focused nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the survival and quality of life for people with cardiovascular disease through research and education. Since its inception in 1991, CRF has played a major role in realizing dramatic improvements in the lives of countless numbers of patients by establishing the safe use of new technologies and therapies in interventional cardiovascular medicine. CRF is the sponsor of the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. For more information, visit http://www.crf.org and http://www.tctconference.com.





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Results of the SAFE-PCI trial presented at TCT 2013


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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

29-Oct-2013



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Contact: Judy Romero
jromero@crf.org
Cardiovascular Research Foundation



Novel study finds using radial versus femoral access during cardiac catheterization may have benefits in women



SAN FRANCISCO, CA October 29, 2013 A clinical trial conducted exclusively in women suggests that an initial strategy of using the radial artery in the arm as the entry point for cardiac catheterization or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in women has potential for reducing bleeding complications. SAFE-PCI for Women is the first registry-based randomized trial in the United States and the first multicenter trial comparing radial with femoral access in the U.S., and its primary findings were presented today at the 25th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine.


Women are at particular risk for bleeding and vascular complications after PCI. While a transradial approach can potentially reduce these complications, this technique has never been prospectively studied in women. Women also have smaller radial arteries than men making radial PCI potentially more challenging.


The SAFE-PCI for Women Trial randomized 1,787 women undergoing elective PCI, urgent PCI or diagnostic catheterization with possible PCI to either a radial or femoral approach. In a novel approach designed to minimize trial costs, the trial used prospectively gathered data collection instruments based upon the existing National Cardiovascular Research Infrastructure (NCRI), a clinical trial infrastructure created through collaboration between the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the American College of Cardiology, and the Duke Clinical Research Institute. It was also built on the NCDR CathPCI Registry, the largest ongoing PCI registry in the world.


The primary efficacy endpoint was bleeding (BARC Types 2, 3 or 5) or vascular complications requiring intervention within 72 hours post-procedure or at hospital discharge, whichever came first. The primary feasibility endpoint was procedural failure defined as the inability to complete the PCI from the assigned access site.


After 1,120 patients had been randomized, 446 of whom had undergone PCI, review of data by the Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) showed that the primary efficacy event rate was markedly lower than expected. The DSMB recommended termination of the trial because the trial was unlikely to show a difference at the planned sample size. No harm was noted in either arm; therefore, the Steering Committee voted to continue the study until enrollment in a quality-of-life sub study was complete.


A total of 1,787 patients were randomized (893 to radial access, 894 to femoral access), 691 of those who underwent PCI (345 radial access and 346 femoral access). In the PCI group, bleeding and complication rates were 1.2 percent in the radial group compared to 2.9 percent in the femoral group (p=0.12). When assessing the overall cohort of randomized patients (those receiving both diagnostic procedures alone as well as those receiving PCI), bleeding and complication rates were 0.6 percent vs. 1.7 percent (p=0.03). The overall procedural failure rate was 6.7 percent in the radial group and 1.9 percent in the femoral group (p

"The SAFE-PCI for Women trial represents several 'firsts.' It is the first randomized trial of interventional strategies in women, the first multicenter randomized trial comparing radial with femoral access in the United States, and the first registry-based randomized trial in the U.S. The treatment benefit of radial access over femoral access was larger than expected (~60 percent) in both the PCI group and total randomized cohorts," said lead investigator Sunil V. Rao, MD. Dr. Rao is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Duke University Medical Center.


"Findings suggest that an initial strategy of radial access is reasonable and may be preferred in women, with the recognition that a proportion of patients will require bailout to femoral access," Dr. Rao added.


"As the first registry-based randomized trial in the United States, the SAFE-PCI for Women trial demonstrates a new paradigm shift for conducting efficient practical clinical trials using the National Cardiovascular Research Infrastructure. This trial construct is a promising approach for future clinical investigations."


###


The SAFE-PCI for Women trial was funded by a consortium of academic, industry, and government entities including Abbott Vascular, ACIST Medical, Eli Lilly, Guerbet, Medtronic, Terumo Medical, The Medicines Company, the FDA Office of Women's Health, and the Duke Clinical Research Institute. Dr. Rao reported being a consultant for AstraZeneca and The Medicines Company.


About CRF and TCT



The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is an independent, academically focused nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the survival and quality of life for people with cardiovascular disease through research and education. Since its inception in 1991, CRF has played a major role in realizing dramatic improvements in the lives of countless numbers of patients by establishing the safe use of new technologies and therapies in interventional cardiovascular medicine. CRF is the sponsor of the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. For more information, visit http://www.crf.org and http://www.tctconference.com.





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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/crf-rot102913.php
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How To Turn Adult Education Into Careers, Quickly





C.J. Forza, a student in the I-BEST program in Washington state, repairs a car for class at Shoreline Community College.



Kavitha Cardoza/WAMU


C.J. Forza, a student in the I-BEST program in Washington state, repairs a car for class at Shoreline Community College.


Kavitha Cardoza/WAMU


This is the third report in a four-part series on adult education.


Adults wanting to go back to school have the odds stacked against them. They juggle many responsibilities, there are long waitlists for classes and often there isn't a connection between what they learn in class and the skills they need to get a job.


But a program offered in Washington state has been so successful in getting adult students into the workforce that more than 20 states are implementing the model. It's called Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training, better known as I-BEST.


About 10 years ago, the Washington state community college system realized it had a serious problem. They had too many people who wanted jobs and too many jobs unfilled.


"And instead of hiding it and saying, 'Wow, we're not doing a good job,' we really exposed it and said, 'Wow! We're not doing a good job!' " says Louisa Erickson, who helps run I-BEST programs. "And asked the people doing the work, what do you think we can do?"


What they did was create a program based on what employers needed students to know — and then made sure that's what students were being taught. To make sure the new program was effective, they used "team teaching."


'The Eye Of The Class'


Candy Benteu and Rachel Rogers teach a child development class at Green River Community College. Benteu teaches the academic content while Rogers teaches basic skills: reading, math and English. Having two teachers in the classroom at the same time helps provide these students with extra supports.


"I'm a much better teacher now," Benteu says.


She says in the past, when students nodded, she assumed they understood what she meant. But she's learned that often they don't. They just don't want to seem stupid, or if they're from a different country, they don't know it's OK to ask a question. So Rogers plays what she calls "the eye of the class."


For example, one thing Rogers looks out for is the use of idioms, which could confuse students.


"Candy would say these phrases like, 'Fly by the seat of your pants.' And I would interrupt, and I'd say, 'Does that mean I'm throwing my pants up in the air and flying?' And she would laugh and the students would laugh because that's what they're thinking," Rogers says. "By my modeling that, it gives them permission that it is OK to ask questions and that's the sign of an intelligent and a good student."


Benteu and Rogers also role-play appropriate workplace behavior, those "soft skills" — such as how to work in a team, follow rules and show up on time — that are critical to success. They may seem obvious, but are not.


"We have lots of conversations about the way we dress and the way we smell. Too much perfume, too much incense, not enough deodorant," Rogers says.


From The Classroom To The Workplace


Students going through this program are pretty typical of what you'd find in any adult education class across the country. They've often dropped out of high school, have low levels of reading and math, many don't speak English fluently.


Through this program, they can take college-level courses and earn certificates in any of the almost 200 courses offered, from medical billing to welding to building maintenance.


I-BEST programs teach students specific skills that employers value.


Students at Shoreline Community College have just finished the theory portion of an auto mechanics class, where they learned about the physics of manual transmissions. Then it's a quick change into overalls and the hands-on part begins.


This class isn't child's play though. Instructor Mark Hankins says students have to learn the complex systems of today's cars so at the end of the program, "they can go out and do a brake job, they can do fluid replacement, they can do inspections.


"And those are the kind of jobs that there's a big need for," he says.


All I-BEST programs have to demonstrate that students can get jobs paying a living wage when they graduate. In most parts of Washington state, that's $13 an hour.


C.J. Forza says his brain "just clicks with engines." He dropped out of school in the 12th grade; he's now 31. He loves cars so much he works part time in a mechanic shop already. Forza's now learning the "why," not just the "how," of repairs.


"Instead of just guessing at what it is, I'm more able to figure out, OK, this issue can be caused by this, this or this," he says.


Like most adults here, Forza is managing many responsibilities, without much money to hold his life together. But he sticks it out because he can see exactly what the connection is between this class and his career.


At the end of one year, Forza will have a certificate in general auto mechanics and will see his pay jump from $10 an hour to $15.


"I want to be the breadwinner of my family. I have a 3-year-old daughter that I need to raise. I want a career not a job," he says.


'Not Everybody Has Bootstraps'


Instructor Hankins says this program really does make a difference.


"I have a student that is now a general manager of a dealership, and I'm sure he's making two or three times more salary than I am right now," he says with a laugh.


It can take years before adults in typical adult education programs can take college courses. But what makes I-BEST unusual is that it shortens that time by bypassing the GED exam completely. Students in a Washington state community college program who earn an associate's degree can receive a high school diploma retroactively.


I-BEST's Erickson says that when people talk about the program's success, they often focus on the numbers and the model and the research. But at its heart, she says, I-BEST is about giving people another chance.


"A lot of people will say, 'Why can't they just pull themselves up by their bootstraps?' But not everybody has bootstraps or even boots," she says.


Erickson says if we can create opportunities to get more people educated and into the workforce, why shouldn't we?


Source: http://www.npr.org/2013/11/02/241897572/how-to-turn-adult-education-into-careers-quickly?ft=1&f=1001
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Michael Chandler vs. Eddie Alvarez full fight video


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Gunman targets TSA in Los Angeles airport shooting

Police stand guard in Terminal 2 at Los Angeles International Airport on Friday, Nov. 1, 2013. A gunman armed with a semi-automatic rifle opened fire at the airport on Friday, killing a Transportation Security Administration employee and wounding two other people. Flights were disrupted nationwide. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)







Police stand guard in Terminal 2 at Los Angeles International Airport on Friday, Nov. 1, 2013. A gunman armed with a semi-automatic rifle opened fire at the airport on Friday, killing a Transportation Security Administration employee and wounding two other people. Flights were disrupted nationwide. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)







In this photo provided to the AP, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, police officers stand near an unidentified weapon in Terminal 3 of the Los Angeles International Airport on Friday, Nov. 1, 2013. Officials said a gunman who opened fire in the terminal was wounded in a shootout with police and taken into custody. (AP Photo)







In this video frame grab provided by KTTV Los Angeles, emergency workers prepare to transfer a wounded Transportation Security Administration officer to a waiting ambulance after a shooting in Terminal 3 at Los Angeles International Airport on Friday, Nov. 1, 2013. A man pulled a semi-automatic rifle from a bag and shot his way past a security checkpoint at the airport on Friday, killing a TSA officer and wounding at least three others, authorities said. (AP Photo/KTTV) MANDATORY CREDIT







This photo provided by the FBI shows Paul Ciancia, 23. Authorities say Ciancia pulled a semi-automatic rifle from a bag and shot his way past a security checkpoint at the airport, killing a security officer and wounding other people. Ciancia was injured in a shootout and taken into custody, police said. (AP Photo/FBI)







This photo provided by the FBI shows Paul Ciancia, 23. Ciancia carrying a note that said he wanted to "kill TSA" pulled a semi-automatic rifle from a bag and shot his way past a security checkpoint at Los Angeles International Airport on Friday, Nov. 1, 2013 killing one Transportation Security Administration officer and wounding two others, authorities said. (AP Photo/FBI)







(AP) — A man toting a semi-automatic rifle, some 150 rounds of ammunition and a grudge against TSA workers shot his way past a security checkpoint at Los Angeles International Airport in a deadly rampage that sent hundreds of travelers fleeing in terror.

When the shooting stopped, a Transportation Security Administration officer was dead. Gerardo I. Hernandez, 39, became the first TSA officer in the agency's 12-year history to be killed in the line of duty.

Five other people were hurt, including two other TSA employees and the gunman, identified as Paul Ciancia, 23, of Pennsville, N.J. He was shot four times by airport police and remained hospitalized but there was no word on his condition.

Ciancia apparently had been living in Los Angeles for about 1½ years, authorities said.

As gunshots rang out in Terminal 3 on Friday morning, swarms of passengers screamed, dropped to the ground or ran for their lives.

Leon Saryan, 65, had just passed through security and was looking for a place to put his shoes and belt back on when he heard gunshots. He fled with a TSA worker, who he said was later wounded slightly, and managed to hide in a store. As he was cowering the corner, the shooter approached.

"He looked at me and asked, 'TSA?' I shook my head no, and he continued on down toward the gate. He had his gun at the ready and but for the grace of God I am here to tell about it," said Saryan, of Milwaukee.

As Saryan was fleeing for his life, others were hiding behind ticket counters and under tables.

"I really thought I saw death," said Anne Rainer, who witnessed the gunfire with her 26-year-old son Ben. The pair were about to leave for New York so her son could see a specialist for a rare genetic condition he has.

They took refuge behind a ticket counter where she said people prayed, cried and held hands. She watched as one person jumped from a second-floor balcony to get away from the gunman.

"Adrenaline went through my head, my body went numb, and I said, 'If I have to go, it's OK because I'm not going to feel it, but I have to save him,'" Rainer said.

Nick Pugh had just handed his driver's license and boarding pass to a TSA screener and was about to walk toward a metal detector when the shooting began. He dove to the floor. Watching panicked people trying to crawl over one another, Pugh got up and bolted through an emergency exit door and onto the airport tarmac.

"I thought with all of the terrorism we've had, get away from the terminal where everyone is," Pugh said. "If there's a lot of people shooting or a bomb, get away from where everybody else is. I just ran."

Others fled into the terminal, taking refuge in coffee shops and lounges as the gunman shot his way toward them. However, some witnesses and authorities said the gunman ignored anyone except TSA targets.

Airport police officers shot the gunman four times, including in the mouth and leg, during a shootout in front of a Burger King in the terminal.

A law enforcement official said the gunman was dressed in fatigues and carried at least five full 30-round magazines of ammunition. In his bag he had a one-page, handwritten note that said he wanted to kill TSA employees and "pigs."

The official, who was not authorized to discuss the investigation publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity, said the note referred to how the gunman believed his constitutional rights were being violated by TSA searches and that he was a "pissed-off patriot" upset at former Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.

On Friday, Ciancia's father in New Jersey had called authorities for help in finding his son after the young man sent one of his siblings a text message about committing suicide, Pennsville Police Chief Allen Cummings said.

The chief said he called Los Angeles police, who sent a patrol car to Ciancia's apartment. There, two roommates said that they had seen him a day earlier and he had appeared to be fine.

Cummings said that the Ciancias — owners of an auto body shop — are a "good family" and that his department had had no dealings with the son.

People who knew Ciancia said they were shocked that he was the alleged gunman.

Ciancia's former roommate in Los Angeles, James Mincey, said he appeared to be unemployed but never showed any disturbing qualities, such as a fascination with guns.

He spoke to Ciancia last week.

"He said he was going back to Jersey, going to work for his dad, and making amends with family problems ... and spending holidays with his family," Mincey told KABC-TV.

Ciancia had been into a next-door restaurant called The Morrison several times, owner Marc Kreiner said.

"He was kind of a quiet guy, came in mostly by himself," Kreiner told the Los Angeles Times.

The attack at the nation's third-busiest airport began around 9:20 a.m. when the gunman pulled the assault-style rifle from a bag he had carried into the terminal, which serves such airlines as Virgin America, AirTran, Horizon Air and JetBlue.

Airport police were running after the gunman within seconds of the first shots being fired, Chief of Airport Police Patrick Gannon said.

The airport was locked down and its normally packed roads were emptied of cars. Across the U.S., aviation officials stopped LAX-bound flights from taking off from other airports, causing delays around the country. Some Los Angeles-bound flights that already were in the air were diverted elsewhere.

Throughout the day, an estimated 1,550 scheduled arriving and departing flights with around 167,000 passengers were affected, according to the airport. That included 86 arriving flights that were diverted to other airports.

After the first attack police, unsure whether the gunman acted alone, escorted travelers out of Terminal 3 as they searched for other possible shooters.

Pugh, who had fled onto the tarmac so quickly he had left his ID behind, was briefly handcuffed until it was determined he wasn't involved.

Rainer and her son were escorted to safety two terminals away, but they left behind their baggage, which included her son's oxygen and feeding tube machine.

Some travelers arriving for flights were held several miles away for hours. When the airport slowly began to reopen late in the afternoon, people by the thousands, many wheeling suitcases, walked down the middle of the four-lane ring road fronting the terminals.

Hernandez, the officer who was killed, was one of the TSA's behavioral detection officers who are stationed throughout the airport looking for suspicious behavior, said J. David Cox Sr., national president of the American Federation of Government Employees.

Friends and neighbors remembered the Los Angeles man as a doting father of two and a good neighbor who went door-to-door warning neighbors to be careful after his home in the Porter Ranch area of Los Angeles was burglarized.

"It's devastating because he was such a great guy," Kevin Maxwell, a friend and former TSA co-worker at the airport, told KNBC-TV. "All he talked about was his family. He was very proud of his son, who played football."

He also had a daughter, Maxwell said.

"No words can explain the horror that we experienced today," TSA Administrator John Pistole said in a message to employees Friday.

Pistole said he planned to arrive in Los Angeles on Saturday to meet with Hernandez's family and the injured employees.

President Barack Obama called the head of the Transportation Security Administration to express his condolences to the families and friends of the dead and injured TSA officers.

In all, five people were taken to hospitals. They included Hernandez, Ciancia, the two wounded TSA officers, and a person who suffered a broken ankle during the chaos. A sixth person was treated at the scene for ringing in the ears from gunfire, the Los Angeles Fire Department said.

Among the people evacuated from the airport, more than dozen were treated for minor injuries such as twisted ankles, exhaustion or stress.

It was not the first shooting at LAX. On July 4, 2002, a limousine driver opened fire at the airport's El Al ticket counter, killing an airline employee and a person who was dropping off a friend at the terminal. Police killed the man.

___

Contributing to this report were Associated Press writers Joan Lowy and Alicia Caldwell in Washington; Greg Risling, Christopher Weber, Alicia Chang, Alicia Rancilio, Gillian Flaccus and Michael R. Blood in Los Angeles; Josh Hoffner in Phoenix; and Michael Rubinkam in Pennsylvania.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-11-02-LAX%20Shooting/id-3bfba4691ff44ecab5f095da4b1f1072
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How to set up and start using your new iPad Air or Retina iPad mini

How to set up and start using your new iPad Air or Retina iPad mini

Everything you need to know to set up and start using your brand new iPad Air or Retina iPad mini

If the iPad Air or the Retina iPad mini is the first iPad you've ever owned, the first thing you'll want to do is get it set up so you can start downloading apps and games, taking photos, and all the other amazing things you can do with it. Whether your new iPad is your first experience with iOS or not, we can get you up and running in no time. Follow along and we'll walk you through the setup process from start to finish!

How to set up your iPad as new

  1. Slide your finger across the bottom of the screen where it says slide to set up.
  2. Now choose your language on the next screen.
  3. Choose your country in the next list.
  4. If you have WiFi, tap on your WiFi network on the next menu. Alternately, you can use a cellular connection, if you have an iPad that supports cellular data and it's already been activated by your carrier.
  5. Type in your WiFi password if you have one.
  6. Now choose if you'd like to enable Location Services. Certain apps like Maps will need location services to be enabled so keep that in mind.
  7. On the next screen, choose Set up as new iPad.
  8. Now you can either sign in with an existing Apple ID or you can create a new one if you don't already have one.
  9. Next choose if you'd like to use iCloud to backup and sync your contacts, calendars, and other data. Most people choose yes for this step.
  10. Now choose if you'd like Find My iPad to be turned on. We highly recommend enabling Find My iPad so in the event your iPad is ever lost or stolen, you may track it from any iOS device by signing into the Find My iPhone app or by going online to icloud.com. It also helps prevent thieves from being able to wipe out your data without knowing your iCloud password.
  11. On the next screen, choose the phone numbers and emails you'd like people to be able to use to contact you. Tap them to select or deselect them.
  12. Now choose if you'd like to enable Siri. We'd recommend choosing yes.
  13. Next let Apple know if you'd like them to be able to collect diagnostics from your iPad to better improve iOS and their products. This decisions is completely up to you.
  14. That's all there is to it. You can now start using your new iPad!

How to set up your iPad using an iPhone backup

If this is the first iPad you've ever owned but you currently own an iPhone and have been making either iTunes or iCloud backups, you can choose to restore your iPad from one of your iPhone backups. This is a really convenient way to transfer all your preferences, settings, contacts, and other personal data. While not everything will transfer, anything that's compatible will.

If you'd prefer to do this opposed to setting up as new, follow our directions on how to restore from an iCloud or iTunes backup:

How to set up your new iPad and transfer data from an Android tablet

If you don't own any other iOS device to transfer data from and you're coming from an Android Tablet or phone, you can always import some of your data from Google contacts to music to some other stuff. There's a little more involved with the process but it's certainly possible. Follow our guide to figure out how:

Retina iPad mini

Retina iPad mini
The world's most popular tiny tablet goes Retina. Features include:

Complete preview >

Released
November, 2013

Alternatives
iPad Air, iPad 2

Replacements
iPad Mini 3
Fall, 2014

Resources
Buyers guide
Help forum

iPad Air

iPad Air
Apple's full-sized iPad gets slimmed down. Features include:

Complete preview >

Released
November, 2013

Alternatives
Retina iPad mini, iPad 2

Replacements
iPad Air 2 (iPad 6)
Fall, 2014

Resources
Buyers guide
Help forum


    






Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/2BoWxUB7HlE/story01.htm
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There's no free lunch, but there could be a 'free' Windows



There's a lot of talk today that operating systems want to be free, perhaps thanks mainly to Apple's marketing of its free upgrade to its latest versons of OS X, iLife, and iWork. InfoWorld's Paul Venezia recently wrote, "Relying on income generated by selling an operating system of any type is becoming a fool's game, and woe be unto them who miss the signs." Give the OS away, just like Apple is supposedly doing. Eliminate the OS as a for-cost item. Make your money from the hardware and services.


Microsoft has been thinking this way, too. In July, in a letter to all Microsoft employees, CEO Steve Ballmer wrote, "the form and delivery of our value will shift to devices and services versus packaged software." Consider the Surface tablet: You purchase the device with its Windows RT OS and Office 2013 included. Consider the Xbox: You purchase the game system complete with its operating system. Mobile devices too: You purchase the device with an OS already on it. There's no extra cost in any of those cases.


[ The InfoWorld deathmatch review: Windows 8.1 vs. OS X Mavericks. | 10 excellent new features in Windows Server 2012 R2 | For quick, smart takes on the news you'll be talking about, check out InfoWorld TechBrief -- subscribe today. ]


Still, I'm baffled as to why people think the OS should be free. Because Apple is perceived as giving away its software for free? Sorry, but you are paying for that OS. It's part of the hardware cost, just as it is when you buy a new PC. Yes, the OS X Mavericks upgrade is free, but so is Microsoft's Windows 8.1 upgrade. Yes, Apple is making more upgrades free of charge to more previous OS X versions than Microsoft is doing for Windows users. But that's a matter of degree, based on the fact its business isn't based on software sales but on hardware and service sales.


Apple is making a lot of hay on its free upgrades, overstating the case in an effective PR move. At the Apple event last week Mac chief Craig Federighi said "the days of spending hundreds of dollars to get the most from your computer are gone." Ha! At the same event, Apple announced the $2,999 Mac Pro. Thank goodness we aren't paying for the OS or iWork, because that would really hurt! Come on, people! Let's not be naive about things being "free."


Giving away iWork is a sign of desperation for Apple, though giving away something nobody wants or uses in the enterprise could be a brilliant move -- it may shift some people from Office if they find they can do what they want with the free iWork on their Macs. On the other hand, Apple reduced the feature set in OS X's iWork to be compatible with its less-capable iOS and Web versions, so perhaps "brilliant" is an overstatement.


Microsoft is not (yet) a hardware-and-software company the way Apple is, so it can't give away Windows 8 to XP and Vista users as Apple can give Mavericks to Lion and Mountain Lion users -- and never mind that Mavericks is a minor upgrade to those OSes, whereas Windows 8 is a huge shift. Microsoft certainly cannot give away Office, a core business for it, as Apple can give away iWork, a minor business for it. Yet Microsoft is basically on the same page as Apple for the long term, as Ballmer said and as the free Windows 8.1 upgrade and inclusion of Office on Windows RT systems show.


Remember, something has to pay for the development costs, and whether that cost is buried in hardware or spread across hardware, software, and services doesn't really matter at the end of the day. You'll pay the same for it however it is allocated.


It's likely that Windows and Office will end up being free because they'll be offered as an Office 365 subscription, where their cost is included in the subscription. The new game is to treat software as a subscription -- Windows, Office, Xbox, Exchange, SharePoint, and Lync -- rather than as a discrete purchase. That's how we will see a world where Windows is "free."


This story, "There's no free lunch, but there could be a 'free' Windows," was originally published at InfoWorld.com. Read more of J. Peter Bruzzese's Enterprise Windows blog and follow the latest developments in Windows at InfoWorld.com. For the latest business technology news, follow InfoWorld.com on Twitter.


Source: http://www.infoworld.com/d/microsoft-windows/theres-no-free-lunch-there-could-be-free-windows-229743?source=rss_infoworld_top_stories_
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